PDA

View Full Version : Saw options


Avaire Archive
06-17-2009, 10:15 AM
Author: NIH
Date: 2/12/2008 4:02 pm EDT
I am remodeling a bath with a 5' x 7' floor. I have already purchased the Avaire tiles and flexible grout.

With such a relatively small and rectangular floor there should only be a few cuts and all of them should be straight.

I own a jig saw (saber saw), circular saw (skil saw), and a table saw. If a purchase a carbide blade for the jig saw, or a diamond blade for the circular or table saw, would any of them work to make the cuts? Which one, if any, would you recommend?

Seems like buying blades for the saws I already have would be cheaper than renting and/or buying a wet saw or angle grinder. Any information you have is appreciated. Thanks for the forum.

Avaire Archive
06-17-2009, 10:16 AM
Author: Journeyman
Date: 2/12/2008 9:19 pm EDT
Frankly I think you are fooling yourself my friend. You obviously have no idea how tuff that porcelain is. On a MOHS Hardness Scale it probably has a hardness of around a strong 7 or maybe 8, diamonds are 10.

Even if you were to add a diamond blade to your collection and even if it were one of the "dry cut diamond blades" you would quickly burn the blade and ruin it without a constant source of cool water.

I'm sure the Avaire guys know exactly what the hardness is and I'll bet I'm not far off.

Rent a wet saw.:)

Avaire Archive
06-17-2009, 10:17 AM
Author: Jonathan
Date: 2/12/2008 11:56 pm EDT
We definitely recommend a wet-saw. You need not buy a commercial wet saw - even a basic wet-saw will do the trick. The key attribute will be a quality blade.

Technically, you can use a score/snap cutter to snap the tile, but it will NOT cut the polymer substrate. It is a tough material to cut. The best and recommended solution is a wet-saw.

Another alternative is taking the tiles to your local home center - in many cases they will cut your tiles for a reasonable fee (call ahead to make sure they offer the service). If you choose this method, remember the old adage: "measure twice and cut once" - it be frustrating to make multiple trips to the hardware store.

Regardless of which method you choose, please use appropriate safety precautions, especially safety glasses.

Enjoy your new Avaire floor!

Avaire Archive
06-17-2009, 10:17 AM
Author: NIH
Date: 2/13/2008 9:45 am EDT
Thanks for the quick replies, just trying to figure out exactly what my cutting options were. Going to the store to buy a basic wet saw right now.

FYI. I have an old snap cutter that I tried on the Avaire. Like you said, it cut the tile easily. I tried few different methods to cut the polymer underneath, and nothing worked very well. That is some tough material.

Thanks again for the responses.